SD Least Wanted.comAquatic invasive Species

SD Least Wanted.com


snakehead

Consists of 4 species:

  • Giant Snakehead (Channa micropeltes)

  • Northern Snakehead (Channa argus)

  • Bullseye Snakehead (Channa marulius)

  • Blotched Snakehead (Channa maculata)

Origin:

Southeast Asia

Identification:

Snakeheads have long, fully connected dorsal and anal fins. Adult snakeheads have large visible teeth on both the upper and lower jaws.

Impacts:

The effects of snakehead introductions are widely unknown as the species has only recently been introduced to the United States. Since they are a largely piscivorous fish, it is believed they may directly compete with native predatory fishes such as walleye and pike.

Range Expansion:

It is believed that snakeheads were introduced to lakes and rivers by aquarists and fish markets after care for the animals became difficult and/or expensive.

South Dakota Distribution:

Snakehead have not been found in South Dakota.

Keep Aquatic Invasive Species Out of South Dakota's Waters

ALWAYS DO:

  • Remove aquatic plants and animals before leaving any waterbody.
  • Drain water from bait bucket, live well, bilge and motor before leaving any waterbody.
  • Dispose of unwanted bait, fish parts, and worms in the trash.
  • Spray/wash boat, trailer, and equipment with high pressure hot water on your way home or at home -OR- dry everything for at least 5 days.
  • Always report questionable species.

NEVER DO:

  • Never release live animals or plants - this includes all aquarium species, bait, pets or water garden plants. Do not release these into the wild. If you cannot find another home for animals, dispose of them in a trash can or bury them. Seal plants in plastic bags and dispose.

WHY?

Because these hitchhikers can:

  • Reduce game fish populations
  • Ruin boat engines and jam steering equipment
  • Make lakes/rivers unusable by boaters and swimmers
  • Dramatically increase the operating costs of drinking water plants, power plants, dam maintenance, and industrial processes
  • Reduce native species
  • Degrade ecosystems
  • Affect human health
  • Reduce property values
  • Affect local economies of water-dependent communities.
More information on ProtectYourWaters.net